Content Writing

  • Be Useful – A website should contain useful, usable content that informs, sells, explains, and provides support to whatever the selling premise is.
  • Be Relevant –  Content also needs to contain the language that is in use by the customers, not the company. For example, your television manufacturing company may refer to the devices as televisions, but your customers are looking for TVs.
  • Be Motivating –  We edit and rewrite content, building compelling messaging and calls-to-action that increase conversions (leads and sales). With a unified voice in your message, we engage your prospects and your customers in a positive, trusting conversation.

One Stone, TEN Birds.

Take one topic about your business and leverage it 10 different ways.  For example, each time a “Hot Topic” is introduced, it’s transformed into several forms of content, including:

content-strategy

  • Search marketing (SEO) article.
  • Email Newsletter to Prospects & Customers.
  • Blog Post (RSS Feed and leveraged through Social Media: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter).
  • Press Releases (which can lead to speaking engagements and media interviews).
  • Video/Podcast (Site Podcast, iTunes Podcast, YouTube and other video sites). Videos also be promoted through social networking sites.
  • Free E-Book, Report, White Paper (to leverage email addresses in exchange for access to the information).
  • Direct Mail – Postcard campaign that invites speakers to a webinar.
  • Webinars – Present information in the form of a webinar, invites a national audience, archives of past presentations available from website with an email address login.
  • Web page with Opt-in Form – Landing pages for 1) Webinar RSVP and 2) Free Downloads.

Develop a ‘Content Strategy’

Developing a content strategy is a little difficult if you don’t understand what is meant by the term.

A website should contain useful, usable content that informs, sells, explains, and provides support to whatever the selling premise is. Somehow it needs to be controlled so it is up-to-date and matches what is going on – not only on the company’s website, but also on their social media websites.

Content also needs to contain the language that is in use by the customers, not the company. For example, your television manufacturing company may refer to the devices as televisions, but your customers are looking for TVs.

Solving those issues is essentially the definition of what a content strategy should be looking to manage.

Here are the four main areas to consider when forming your content strategy:

Search Engines

  • What are people looking for?
  • What words do they use when searching the search engines?
  • What descriptions do you put into the navigation?
  • Where do you want your audience to link?

Analytics

  • What kind of content do your people seek?
  • How long do people stay in your content?
  • How often do they share it with others?

Social Media

  • What are people talking about?
  • Do they get engaged with your products/market?
  • What do they say to others?

Email Marketing

  • How do you get people back on your site?
  • How do you get them to make requests for more information?
  • How do you get them to buy more efficiently?

eCommerce

  • Whom do you want to attract as potential customers?
  • What do your product descriptions say and how do they aid the buying decisions?
  • What are conversion rates for one page of content versus another?
  • What is working well and what isn’t?

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